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All Posts in Category: Gum Disease

How often should you see your hygienist for dental cleanings?

October is National Dental Hygiene Month.

How often should you see your hygienist for dental cleanings?  Some people may say that you should go every six months, some people may say every 3-4 months, and others may only visit the dental office when they are experiencing pain.

So, which one is right for you?

The answer is not as black and white as you may think…National Dental Hygiene Month image

Dental cleaning frequency is completely dependent upon the patient and their individual needs.

It is the same concept as when someone goes to physical therapy or rehab and the therapist creates a custom program for each individual in order to get them back to health (there is no blanket solution).

Patients who have seen the dentist regularly and practice good oral home care may only need to have a dental cleaning every six months because they have minimal build up and little to no bleeding in the gums.  On the other hand, some patients who have not seen the dentist regularly and/or do not practice good oral home care may need to have their teeth cleaned every 3 to 4 months because they have moderate to severe build up and bleeding in the gums or they have been previously diagnosed with periodontal disease (loss of bone around the teeth).

The goal is to get your teeth cleaned frequently enough to keep the bacterial plaque build up at a minimal level so that either healing can occur or so that the tissues can stay in an optimum state of health.

In order to see what frequency is right for you, you should see your hygienist and discuss what treatment cycle will give your teeth and gums the best outcome.

Call for your dental hygiene appointment! 972-231-0585

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How Important Is it to Keep Your Hygiene Appointment?

I am married to Dr. Korenman and I work in the office everyday with our Loveable Team.

Cindy Korenman

Cindy Korenman

I confirm appointments and tell all of you the importance of coming to clean and check your teeth on a regular basis.

It had been since last October that I personally had Tray our hygienist clean and check my teeth.

I am an avid flosser and brusher.  I’m OCD about it.  I floss every time I eat anything.  I like eating about every two hours as I claim to be a health fanatic.

Today there was an opening and I had my dental cleaning.

I do have beautiful teeth, thanks to Dr. Korenman and I feel that I take excellent care of them.

But I didn’t get my dental work cleaned and checked for a while.

Thank God I did it today as right at the gum line on two of my beautiful teeth, Tray and Dr. Korenman confirmed I had the beginning of decay.

Good old stress got the better of my teeth.  Maybe if I had done my cleaning timely it could have been prevented.

Thanks to Tray, who by the way is an excellent hygienist, is the best who has ever cleaned my teeth. He’s very kind, gentle and knowledgeable about teeth.  I am so grateful for him to be part of our team.

Thanks Tray for your service and for keeping me healthy! Learn more about Tray here.

Tray our Dental Hygienist.

Tray our Dental Hygienist.

 

Call for your hygiene appointment! 972-231-0585

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Loveable Smiles Patient Experiences Relief from Dry Mouth Thanks to New Laser Therapy

Linda Terveen used to wake up in the middle of the night with her tongue glued to the top of her mouth and her cheeks stuck to her teeth.medication side effect
She would wake up in desperate prayer hoping she’d be able to drink some water and relieve her seriously dry mouth.

During the day, Linda would constantly experience unquenchable thirst.

Linda is like so many others who suffer from a common medication side effect: Dry Mouth.

Dry Mouth is not a disease, but a symptom of a medical disorder and/or most commonly, a side effect of popular medications including:
• Blood pressure medications
• Anti-depression/Anti-Anxiety
• Cholesterol Fighters
• Pain killers
• Antihistamines/Decongestants
• Even neurological medications for treatment of ADHD.

Thanks to a new laser treatment at Loveable Smiles in Richardson, TX, Linda now feels more rested because her sleep is no longer interrupted due to extreme dry mouth.
Her saliva glands have been re-stimulated and now function better to create the moisture that is needed for the mouth, teeth and gums.

Dr. Korenman is the first in Dallas/Ft. Worth to offer this breakthrough laser treatment for Dry Mouth.

This is the first treatment that actually deals with the problem of Dry Mouth itself and not just the symptoms.

The treatment is painless, simple and quick.

If you would like to find out more about this phenomenal treatment, please call us and schedule an appointment to see how we may be able to help you. 972-231-0585

Learn more about the dangers of dry mouth here.

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Father’s Day Dental Care Tips for Dads

If you’re the man of the house, you probably think that dental health is the last thing on your priority list. Today’s dads are busy with their careers, kid’s (or grandkid’s) activities and “Honey Do” lists.

However, if you want to be healthy for your family, you must take care of your teeth.Attentive Man

Dr. Mayo of Mayo Clinic has explained, “Having a healthy mouth can add 10 years to your life.”

Medication
Does dad take any kind of heart medication including blood pressure or cholesterol meds?

These medications are notorious for causing dry mouth and inhibiting salivary flow. The flow of saliva is crucial for washing away the germs that cause cavities, so dry mouth is bacteria’s playground!

Dad should have regular checkups to manage his Dry Mouth symptoms, chew sugarless gum and swish with water on a regular basis.

Diabetes
Is dad Diabetic?

The statistics about Diabetes and dental care are startling:diabatic man

  1. Uncontrolled Type II Diabetics are at a higher risk for gum disease.
  2. Severe gum disease can affect blood sugar.
  3. Diabetics have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums.
  4. Medication can cause dry mouth which can cause soreness, ulcers, infections and cavities.
  5. A dry mouth can exacerbate the side effects of diabetes, which will then lead to an increase in glucose levels, wreaking havoc on the body.
  6. Having a dry mouth, especially as a diabetic, can lead to rampant tooth decay, which means blood sugar increases as the body tries, and fails, to fight infection.
  7. Sometimes if the blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, the result is dry mouth.

Once again, it’s important to maintain regular dental care appointments to avoid the inflammation, gum disease and decay that can be caused by Diabetes and medication.

Dental Coward
We know dads have a reputation for being the “tough guy” but even “tough guys” can dread visiting the dentist. Many men have had bad experiences at the dentist and understandably avoid dental exams.

Dr. Korenman and his staff understand dental fear and they are dedicated to reversing the trend of miserable dental experiences. He will never cause his patients pain and he listens to all of their concerns.

If it’s been some time or even a long time since dad’s last appointment, we want him to know that we never will scold him or make him feel guilty because we are just glad to see him.

We are here to serve our patients for a healthy future.

Please schedule Dad’s Total Health Dental Appointment by calling 972-231-0585.

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Having trouble sleeping? Go see your dentist.

Because dentists see into their patient’s mouths more than physicians, they have an important part in identifying sleep related disorders.

 

What is sleep apnea?sleep apnea

More than 18 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea.

 

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by abnormal pauses is breathing, or instances of abnormally low breathing during sleep.

 

This can lead to daytime sleeplessness and fatigue, snoring, restless sleep, dry mouth and/or throat and teeth grinding.  Sufferers can start and stop breathing up to hundreds of times per night.

 

So, how is sleep apnea related to your mouth?

While dentists aren’t licensed to formally diagnose sleep apnea in patients, during a common dental exam there are certain indications that could point to a possible sleep disorder. The dentist can then refer the patient to a sleep specialist.

 

Dental Signs Indicating Sleep Apnea

 

Enlarged tongue and/or tonsils in addition to teeth indentations along the tongue.

 

Teeth Grindingteeth grinding

Grinding and clenching of the teeth (Bruxism) is often caused by stress and it can cause teeth to break, cause pain in the jaw and even result in headaches and migraines.

One of the ways Dr. Korenman of Loveable Smiles in Richardson, TX helps patients is by utilizing night-time tooth guards which not only protect the teeth from stress, but also protects the muscles.

In addition to the elimination of teeth grinding, many patients who wear the NTI mouth guard have found an improvement with their headaches and have also found that they sleep better.

Dry Mouth

Dry mouth results from open-mouth sleeping, which is common among individuals suffering from obstructive sleep apnea or OSA.

 

Saliva contains beneficial phosphates, minerals and calcium that protect tooth enamel from being eroded by bacteria. Without the continuous flow of saliva, the mouth becomes a horrendous breeding ground for bacteria that can lead to extensive tooth decay, gum disease and mouth sores.

 

Gum disease not only leads to severe oral health disorders, but can exacerbate overall health conditions, such as diabetes or respiratory disorders.

 

Patients with mild to moderate sleep apnea often benefit from wearing an oral appliance at night.  This helps keep the airway open during sleep.

We urge you to call Loveable Smiles for your Total Health Dental Care appointment. 972-231-0585

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Women & Gum Disease – How Your Gums Change in Various Stages of Life

There is an important connection between a woman’s oral health and her overall health. women-brushing-01

It’s called the “Mouth-Body Connection,” and it means that certain dental conditions like gum disease, can severely deteriorate her body, especially her lungs and heart, and it can also lead to a host to other conditions including Alzheimer’s disease and even some Cancers.

Hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life, including puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause, can affect many tissues, including gum tissue.

Throughout her life cycle, women should be aware of these hormonal and oral/overall health connections. It’s very important for women to maintain their dental care appointments so that their dentists can check them for gum disease and other concerning dental issues.

Oral birth control: Inflamed gums are a common side effect of taking the pill. Dr. Korenman and his staff can give you suggestions to protect your gums and teeth.

Pregnancy: There is a link between uncontrolled gum disease (and the mom may not even know she has gum disease) and pregnancy complications such as premature labor and preeclampsia (rise in blood pressure). pregnancy and dental health

Additionally studies have shown that bacteria responsible for tooth decay are passed from the mother to the child in utero. The more frequently you give in to the craving for sugary snacks, the greater the chance of developing tooth decay. Women are encouraged to call their dentist for an appointment as soon as they learn they are pregnant.

Menopause: During menopause, changing hormone levels can cause various mucus membranes to dry out including salivary glands, often leaving menopausal and postmenopausal women with a persistent feeling of dryness in the mouth. Other oral changes that may occur during menopause are red or inflamed gums, mouth sores, bad breath, burning sensations, and altered taste, especially salty, peppery or sour.

The health of your mouth can be a sign of your body’s health. Mouth problems are not just cavities, toothaches, and crooked or stained teeth. Many diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease, and some cancers are linked with oral health problems. Regular dental exams help you maintain good oral health and avoid related health problems.

At Loveable Smiles, we practice Total Health Dentistry and educate our patients on the “Mouth Body Connection.” Additionally, we check all our patients for gum disease.

If you are diagnosed with gum disease, Dr. Korenman will design a treatment plan to help you get it under control and even more importantly, to keep it maintained in a healthy state.

We urge you to tell your mom to call Loveable Smiles for your Total Health Dental Care appointment at 972-231-0585.

Happy Mother’s Day from Loveable Smiles in Richardson!

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American Heart Month: Heart Disease & Dry Mouth

February is American Heart Month and Dr. Larry Korenman of Loveable Smiles in Richardson has some important information for you.

If you take medication for heart disease you are probably experiencing a very dangerous side effect: Dry Mouth.heart month cropped

Dry Mouth is a side effect of popular heart medications including:

  • Blood pressure medications
  • Anti-depression/Anti-Anxiety
  • Diuretics
  • Cholesterol medication

The combination of two or more of these medications dramatically increases dry-mouth effects.

If you take any type of heart medication, it’s very important for you to take care of your dental health because Dry Mouth can lead to the following:

  • Tooth decay
  • Gum disease, including bacterial infections.
  • Fungal infections
  • Mouth sores
  • Bad breath

Additionally several theories exist to explain the link between periodontal (gum) disease and heart disease.heart-gum-diseases image

  1. Oral bacteria can affect the heart via the blood stream and then attaching to fatty plaques in the coronary arteries (heart blood vessels) and contributing to clot formation.
  2. Another possibility is that the inflammation caused by periodontal (gum) disease increases plaque buildup, which may contribute to swelling of the arteries.

Researchers have found that people with gum disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease.

Treating Dry Mouth

While there isn’t any cure for dry mouth, the sooner it gets diagnosed the less damage it does to your teeth.  Here are some tips for treating your dry mouth.

  • Korenman highly recommends Effervess Oral Care products, which can help relieve the symptoms of dry mouth caused by medications. (Available at Loveable Smiles and Amazon.) The line includes toothpaste and a whitening gel.
  • Swish with water in addition to drinking it.
  • Chew sugarless gum.
  • Patients with dry mouth should have regular dental checkups with Dr. Korenman and his staff for evaluation and treatment. Please bring up-to-date medication list with you to your appointment at Loveable Smiles.

If you are experiencing a dry mouth as a side effect of your medication, please call Loveable Smiles at 972-231-0585

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Crowded Teeth and Your Overall Health

This blog post is part of a series of Total Health Dental Care articles to inform our readers about the connection between your oral health and your overall health.

 
It’s called the “Mouth-Body Connection,” and it means that poor dental health can severely deteriorate your body.  Today we are discussing the connection between malocclusion (poor “bite” or fitting together of the teeth) and your overall health.

 
Straightening teeth is no longer only for appearance. Straightened teeth contribute directly to your overall health. bite-problems-malocclusions_large

 

What is a Malocclusion?

Malocclusion is often referred to overcrowding or misalignment of your teeth. Specifically, it refers to the relationship between your upper and lower teeth, which should fit together evenly with low force exuded on the jaws and tooth surfaces. If there is a misalignment between the upper and lower teeth, then a number of symptoms can occur:

  • Premature wearing and breaking of teeth which can lead to tooth loss.
  • Chronic headaches
  • Neck and jaw pain
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Pain of facial muscles
  • Joint noises in the jaw
  • Difficulties with biting or chewing

Teeth that are crowded or out of alignment are more difficult to keep clean which can contribute to gum disease.

 
Gum disease not only leads to severe oral health disorders, but can exacerbate overall health conditions, such as diabetes or respiratory disorders.  If left untreated, malocclusion can progress to affect bone, jaw, neck, and even head health.

 
Additionally, the improvements to bite functionality that result from malocclusion treatment can also make regular nutritional intake easier.

 

More About Gum Disease

80% of people have Gum Disease and DO NOT KNOW IT! There is usually no pain involved for people until extremely late in the degeneration. Many gum problems will go unnoticed until they are diagnosed by a dentist.oral health = overall health photo

 
The good news is that Dr. Korenman and his team are dedicated to educating the public about the dangers of gum disease and they check all their patients for it.

If you are diagnosed with gum disease, Dr. Korenman can design a treatment plan to help you keep it under control.

Problems with your bite can lead to problems elsewhere in your body. And, at Loveable Smiles, we understand the connection.

We urge you to call Loveable Smiles for your Total Health Dental Care appointment. 972-231-0585

This is just one of many examples of how we treat people, not just teeth.

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How is Pancreatic Cancer related to your mouth?

This blog post is part of a series of Total Health Dental Care articles to inform our readers about the connection between your oral health and your overall health.

 

It’s called the “Mouth-Body Connection,” and it means that poor dental health can severely deteriorate your body, especially your lungs and heart, and it can also lead to a host to other conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, strokes and even some Cancers.

 

What is a Pancreatic Cancer? pancreatic

Pancreatic Cancer occurs when there is out-of-control cell growth in the pancreas. The cells continue dividing and form lumps called tumors, which interfere with the normal functioning of the pancreas.

 

Pancreatic Cancer/Gum Disease Statistics

 

  1. Pancreatic Cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer related death in the US.
  2. 74% of Pancreatic Cancer patients die after the 1st year.
  3. Unfortunately, treatment options are limited.
  4. Studies have shown positive association between gums disease and bone disease and Pancreatic Cancer.
  5. In one study men with a history of gum disease, had a 63% higher risk of developing Pancreatic Cancer than those with no gum disease.
  6. People with chronic inflammation caused by gum disease harbor higher levels of harmful bacteria and carcinogens in the mouth and gut. Over many years, this can lead to higher amounts cancer-causing nitrosamines.

 

Chemotherapy & Dental Health

Most chemotherapy agents suppress white blood cells, which protect against infection.

Chemotherapy also effects saliva production, leading to dry mouth, and serious dental implications.

The oral tissues can become very inflamed, cavities can become rampant, and gums may bleed easily.

Additionally, if you are a patient and either about to start or are currently undergoing cancer treatments, here at Loveable Smiles, we will provide you with a complimentary fluoride tray to save your teeth.

Shocking Truth About Gum Disease

80% of people have Gum Disease and DO NOT KNOW IT! There is usually no pain involved for people until extremely late in the degeneration. Many gum problems will go unnoticed until they are diagnosed by a dentist.

The Good News for Cancer Patients & Gum Disease

Dr. Korenman and his team are dedicated to educating the public about the dangers of gum disease and they check all their patients for it.

If you are diagnosed with gum disease, Dr. Korenman can design a treatment plan to help you keep it under control.

We urge you to call Loveable Smiles for your Total Health Dental Care appointment where we will check you for gum disease at 972-231-0585.

This is just one of many examples of how we treat people, not just teeth.

#gumdisease

#PancreaticCancer

#canceranddentalhealth

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How is Diabetes related to your mouth?

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and we want to educate Diabetics on oral care and gum disease.

This blog post is part of a series of Total Health Dental Care articles to inform our readers about the connection between your oral health and your overall health.

 

It’s called the “Mouth-Body Connection,” and it means that poor dental health can severely deteriorate your body, especially your lungs and heart, and it can also lead to a host of other conditions including Alzheimer’s disease and even some Cancers.

 

So, how is Diabetes related to your mouth? Diabetes-and-your-oral-health image 2

 

If you have gum disease you’re sending bacteria and inflammation by-products through your blood vessels, damaging the vessels and exacerbating your diabetes condition.

 

The startling news is that 80% of people have Gum Disease and DO NOT KNOW IT! There is usually no pain involved for people until extremely late in the degeneration. Many gum problems will go unnoticed until they are diagnosed by a dentist.

 

Additionally, this is how gum disease affects Diabetics:

  1. Uncontrolled Type II Diabetics are at a higher risk for gum disease.
  2. Severe gum disease can affect blood sugar.
  3. Diabetics have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums.
  4. Medication can cause dry mouth which can cause soreness, ulcers, infections and cavities.
  5. A dry mouth can exacerbate the side effects of diabetes, which will then lead to an increase in glucose levels, wreaking havoc on the body.
  6. Having a dry mouth, especially as a diabetic, can lead to rampant tooth decay, which means blood sugar increases as the body tries, and fails, to fight infection.
  7. Sometimes if the blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, the result is dry mouth.

 

Your gums are the “foundation of your house” and if the foundation crumbles, the house crumbles with it. *Diabetes-and-Your-Dental-Health image

 

Medications and Dry Mouth

Medications that treat high blood pressure or other heart problems, including diuretics, are often used by many patients to manage complications of diabetes.  A very common side effect of these medications is Dry Mouth.

The combination of two or more of these medications dramatically increase dry-mouth effects.

Dry mouth is a growing problem in dentistry.  On a daily basis, Dr. Korenman and his staff see patients who suffer from dry mouth and the issues associated with dry mouth including tooth decay, gum disease and mouth sores.

The Good News for Diabetes Patients

The good news is that Dr. Korenman and his team are dedicated to educating the public about the dangers of gum disease and they check all their patients for it.

If you are diagnosed with gum disease, Dr. Korenman can design a treatment plan to help you overcome it and then to keep it under control.

Additionally, if you suffer from Dry Mouth, Dr. Korenman provides the following tips for treating this dangerous condition:

  • He highly recommends Effervess Oral Care products, which can help relieve the symptoms of dry mouth caused by medications. (Available at Loveable Smiles and Amazon.) The line includes toothpaste and a whitening gel.
  • Swish with water in addition to drinking it.
  • Chew sugarless gum.
  • Patients with dry mouth should have regular dental checkups with Dr. Korenman and his staff for evaluation and treatment. Please bring up-to-date medication list with you to your appointment at Loveable Smiles.

We urge you to call Loveable Smiles for your Total Health Dental Care appointment at 972-231-0585.

This is just one of many examples of how we treat people, not just teeth.

*Dr. Elias J. Achey Jr., D.M.D. “A cup of coffee with 12 leading dentists in the United States.

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